Tom asked for a solution in his blog for exporting photos from iPhoto to Flickr. Since he closed the comments on his blog post (for whatever reason that is) I’ll try and answer the question via trackback.

There certainly is a solution to exporting photos from iPhoto to Flickr. The excellent FlickrExport which I already use for a long time. It’s a clean and easy solution and really integrates nicely with all of iPhotos functions.

So give it a try, Tom 😉

I’ve never thought much about Virtual Desktops in OS X although I have used it frequently on Linux Desktops and at the beginning in OS X Panther.
My thought always was: why more than one Desktop, when I’ve got Expos?. After watching the following video I might have changed my mind.
Virtual Desktops and Expos? seems to be the way to got!

See Spaces and Expos??of the upcoming OS X 10.5 Leopard in action:

Not enough that I can blog with ecto, use Flock or login into WordPress directly to feed you with news… No!
Now I found a Dashboard widget (which I’m using right now) that allows me to kick off a few lines very quickly.

WordPressDash is an easy solution to post simple texts. For more complex layouts I would rather switch to ecto but WordPressDash lets you set the Category your entry is poted in and there is even a choice if you want to save it as draft or post it directly for everyones viewing pleasure :)

After reading a tip (and the comments) at about how to mount a server via the finders sidebar using automator I came up with a very easy way to access my server via SSH in the Terminal.

This method lets you open the Terminal, automatically ssh’ed into your server, via Spotlight, the Finders Sidebar, the Dock, your Desktop or anywhere else you can think of.
The following is a step by step tutorial on how to achieve this.

  1. First you make sure your server is accessible without a password (via ssh public key authentication) for your own convenience. This step can be left out as well but it is much better this way 😉
    Read about how to set this up here. The entry is in german but the steps you have to take are in english, so it should be easy to follow.
  2. Open up TextEdit with a new document and fill in the address to the server in the following form:
    Select the text, click and hold until the cursor turns into your normal mouse pointer. Now drag and drop the text to your desktop as shown in the picture to the right (click on it for a bigger view). This creates a shortcut file on your Desktop that you can rename to whatever you want. You can even change the icon on it!
    Now close TextEdit.
  3. Next choose a location for the file in your filesystem. I made a folder called “connections” in my home folder where I plan to keep all my server connection shortcuts. But we’re not stopping here. The shortcut is a normal file as any other in OS X, so you can drag it to your sidebar, keep it in your Dock, search for it with Spotlight or click on it in the Finder.


If you happen to use and love Launchbar like me, there is an even quicker way to open your server connection: Open the Launchbar Configuration ([CMD]+Y in Launchbar) and right click / [CRTL]+click in the left pane where all the different rules are listed. Click on New Rule -> Folder… and in the resulting dialog choose the folder where you keep your connection shortcuts.
Now you can open each of them by just typing the name of the shortcut in Launchbar and hitting enter.